Sunday, October 14, 2012

Modern Dance

Sanders Theatre, Harvard University, 3:00pm

RAVEL, Introduction and Allegro

COPLAND, Appalachian Spring

RESPIGHI, Trittico Botticelliano (Change)

MÁRQUEZ, Danzón No. 2

 

Jonathan McPhee, Conductor

Barbara Poeschl-Edrich, Harp

 

 

Jonathan McPhee makes his debut as guest conductor leading Pro Arte through a program of dances. Mr. McPhee is known for his clear conducting patterns, body language and precise cues. The program starts with a portrayal of classical dance rhythms in Ravel’s suite, moving into Copland’s ballet and ending with Márquez’ fiery Mexican danzón.

Jonathan McPhee is equally at home as a conductor for the symphony, ballet, and opera.  As Music Director for Boston Ballet, he has received critical acclaim for his work with the Company and Orchestra, which is the second largest musical organization in Boston.  Mr. McPhee is also Music Director for the Lexington Symphony. and the Nashua Symphony & Chorus in New Hampshire.

Click here for a transcript of our interview with Maestro McPhee.

Since moving to Boston in 2001, Barbara Poeschl-Edrich has played with the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Boston Pops, Boston Classical Orchestra, Boston Baroque, Handel & Haydn Society, Providence Singers, Collage New Music, the Tanglewood Music Center, Boston Cecilia Society, Boston Musica Viva, Boston Camerata, Harvard Baroque Orchestra, Blue Heron Renaissance Choir, as well as many orchestras in New England. As a soloist Mrs. Poeschl-Edrich appeared with Boston Baroque, Newport Baroque, Symphony Pro Musica, Lexington Symphony, New England String Ensemble, Music at Eden’s Edge, Ars Antiqua and Boston Classical Orchestra. She has recorded with La Donna Musicale and Aston Magna. Mrs. Poeschl-Edrich has earned degrees in Salzburg and London. In 2005, she graduated in Harp Performance and Historical Performance with a Doctor of Musical Arts from Boston University. She is on the faculty of Boston University.

“The power of music to communicate is irrefutable. Whether you sing in a chorus, play in an instrumental ensemble, dance, teach, or support it as an audience participant, music is the tuest form of opening hte human mind.” Jonathan McPhee
 
“Stravinsky’s Pulcinella Suite [performed by Symphony Nova Scotia]…crackled with energy and surprisingly tight rhythmic balance….McPhee’s conducting style is restrained, but obviously what lay behind it was the thorough preparation of the orchestra during rehearsals, which was evident in all four works on the program….They all showed meticulous preparation and detailed knowledge of the intricacies within all four scores….Close listening revealed a high level of faithfulness to musical dynamics and tempos as well as the work’s design and structure. McPhee’s interpretation of Schubert’s Fifth Symphony showed a faithful adherence to virtually all the values of the score.” Stephen Pedersen, The Chronicle-Herald